Random header image... Refresh for more!

Category — Resilience

How the World Works: John Casti at TEDxVienna

 

 

Dr. Casti received his Ph.D. in mathematics at the University of Southern California. He worked at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA, and served as a profesor in the USA before becoming one of the first members of the research staff at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Vienna, Austria. He has also been on the faculty of the Technical University of Vienna and the Santa Fe Institute in the USA. He has published eight technical monographs in the area of system theory and mathematical modeling, as well as 12 volumes of popular science, including Paradigms Lost, Complexification, Would-Be Worlds, The Cambridge Quintet, and Mood Matters. His 2012 book, XEVENTS addresses the role complexity overload plays in the creation of potentially life-changing events such as the crash of the Internet or the outbreak of a global pandemic. Dr. Casti is currently Director of The X-Center, a prívate research institute in Vienna focusing on development of tools for anticipation of extreme events in human society.

August 20, 2014   No Comments

Nassim Nicholas Taleb: How to Live in a World We Don’t Understand

 

The Department of Political Science and Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability present Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a world renowned author and scholar who will discuss his work on uncertainty, randomness, and disorder outlined in his new book: Antifragile. Taleb’s works focuses on decision making under uncertainty, as well as technical and philosophical problems with probability and metaprobability, in other words “what to do in a world we don’t understand”

How Things Gain from Disorder

Based on his continuing exploration of the decision making process under opaque circumstances, Nassim Taleb, author of The Black Swan and Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder, shares how the benefits of random conditions can be successfully harvested to help navigate a world we do not fully understand.

August 16, 2014   No Comments